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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:00am EST
on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center for four years. most americans don't realize he was a congressman. many don't even know he was president. >> by your going to change that. >> yes. he was this enormously courageous congressman. the first congressman to stand up and call for emancipation before lincoln even knew how to spell the word. >> we will get back to emancipation and the abolition movement. someone said to me the other day i have read to biographies of joh
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00am EST
to say because i am from washington and because it is halloween and because i have three children, all of them love to trick or treat our will report that the most popular costume that has come up lately is binders full of women. what this halloween costume looks like is you put your arms in the binder, it is not a jack in the box but jacqueline in the box and jacqueline pops out of a folder in the halloween costume. who said we were dull in washington? we are very creative. i am going to tell the story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlantic story that came out in 2010 and basically i had been vacationing in a town for a long time which was a prosperous working-class town and one year i went there a bit seemed there are not many men are round. i was seeing him in church or the fair grounds or driving down the street ritter trucks doing construction. this was the height of the housing collapse that anita hill talked-about. men were finding a hard time. we talked about the man session and loss of manufacturing jobs and i became curious abo
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 4:15pm EST
in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about an hour ten minutes. >>> hello, everyone, want i want to welcome you to the program which features an al star lineup of authors who will be doing the most recent book on the supreme court. i'm a professor here at georgetown. and executive directer of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event, and i'd like to thank our deputy directer dory burn seen to putting it together. before i turn the program over to our moderators, i'd like to remind thearch after the program, we have a reception following in which you'll gate chance to have all your newly purchased books signed by the authors. have a word or two with the authors, hopefully, and as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderators. today for today's program tony morrow. tony needs no introduction at all. i'll keep it short and tell you that tony has long been one of the nation's most influential journalists covering the supreme
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 12:30pm EST
, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i look at this from two perspective, the global forces that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power to united states and the west to china and the east hours of globalization in the digital era. how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threat of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at the time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated to our society. it's a new know mom that. --
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 3:00pm EST
when i first came to washington after my doctorate and one of the first books i was exposed to was tom's book titled the state of ridge, where the government sponsored enterprise in the financial crisis, clearly tom was years ahead of his time at his predictions turned out to be all too accurate. a very long track record of being one of the 04 most forecasters of the state of the financial-services industry but when he is not writing books he spends his time as a fellow at the center for dance to governmental studies at johns hopkins university. tom also served as staff on the financial crisis inquiry commission and in my opinion there are a few things i would disagree with the commission's findings one thing i know for certain is the commission's report was stronger because of tom's involvement. the book is also informed largely by tom's experience on commission staff. we are fortunate to have with us alex pollock to offer his thoughts on the book. alex is resident fellow at the american enterprise institute. i got to know alex a decade ago when he was president and chief operating of
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 10:15am EST
as one and it's in the book washington state university, the student wrote a play called the passion of offending of a buddy. he put it on the ticket. he put it everywhere. it isn't easily defended and this african-american student had the absolute goal of defending everybody and he made a point of it defending it all throughout. the university worked with students angry about the content of the play and they told them to stand up in the middle and shout i am offended which is ironic because that is the point of the play. it's going to go over badly. and the university president actually defended the next day. the students that disrupted the play as saying this was a very irresponsible exercise of the freedom of speech on the part of the angry mob of students that shut down the play and its stunning that they got that one. it's a great point and the censorship campuses. >> my name is dave clemens from ontario. i was wondering if you see any room for fire to expand into canada. i think there's a great group in canada. my only thing is i think the death of a nonprofit caused them to sp
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 2:30pm EST
people of blindness. now imagine entire washington metro area. about 3 million people. imagine all those people blind. now they can see. that's not -- that's not an obscure story. it's not an obscure story in the world of people. people know about the hospital. people travel from all over the world to go to the hospital to train to bring the same programs to their countries. it becomes a movement to end needless blindness. it's one example you might say that's -- got to be an exception. hundreds and hundreds of stories like that. and those are the stories that are transforming the global economy. not just the economy, societies building the future. >> so as you say in the next twenty years, 3 billion more people will enter to the world of economic freedom or another least -- >> right cognitive freedom. economic freedom. >> is the wild west does it need to be managed? how should it be managed? >> well,, you know, i like the core metaphor in describing the economy and the interaction of the economy and the society is reinforced. and when we go the rain forest whether it's the pacific north
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7